South Coast Geological Society

Welcome to South Coast Geological Society!

We invite you to explore our new webpage and home to SCGS! Here you will find information about future meetings, newsletters, available publications, current job postings and opportunities. Please join the geology community and subscribe to our mailing list to receive the latest news about social events, lectures, and field trips!

If you have any questions, comments or concerns, please email scgs.mgmt@gmail.com

About

The South Coast Geological Society (SCGS) is one of the oldest and most active geological societies in California. Originating in the early 70’s, the founders of this society encouraged a casual environment where industry professionals could gather, network and share their latest research and theories. Through the years, we have grown in membership and meeting venues have changed to accommodate that growth.

We currently meet at Dave & Buster’s in Orange, California for our monthly meetings where we host a meal and a lecture presentation. Meetings are usually held on the first Monday of the month. Meeting location and days sometimes vary so be sure to check this website for updates. SCGS members are typically persons in geologic professions living and/or working in Orange County & San Diego County, California. Membership includes all disciplines, ranging from hydrogeologists, geotechnical engineers, petroleum geologists, mining geologists, environmental geologists, college professors, students and others. We are a society run by volunteers, with the purpose of sharing geologic ideas and fellowship during monthly meetings and an annual field trip.

An annual field trip is organized each year in the fall. These trips produce our renowned guide books each year and showcase the geology and our routes for those trips. If you weren’t able to catch the actual field trip, you can recreate that trip by following the instructions provided in the books minus the live talks, crowds & caravans. We currently have 43 road books available and they can be purchased on our publications page, at our meetings, or at the Nevada Mineral & Book Company in Tustin.

Being a non-profit organization, we operate from donations and corporate sponsorships, hard-working volunteers and a dedicated membership. Many of our members have dutifully supported this community by serving as officers to ensure the society’s growth. Some of our members have received recognition as honorary members due to their extended contributions to the society. This society is purely driven by the passion and devotion of its members for the geosciences and dates des phases lunaires (calendrier).

Company sponsorship is encouraged and vital to our success. Sponsorships fund our guidebook publication, offset the food and supply costs for the annual field trip and our monthly meetings, and provide our educational scholarship program. Our 4-tier sponsorship program is designed to make it easy to contribute at a level that you are comfortable with. Your donations are greatly appreciated, but please don’t forget to participate as we always have a great time.

We promote growth in the industry by stimulating students to showcase their research. Poster sessions are held by colleges and sponsored by the SCGS. Our goal is to motivate student interest by providing awards that are distributed to winners of multiple categories. SCGS also hosts a poster session meeting in November showcasing some of the best research we saw over the year, winners will be announced and awards will be given. To encourage student membership and participation, the student membership dues are reduced, and dinner costs are reduced for all professors and students attending a meeting. We would again like to thank our corporate sponsors for providing us the ability to do this.

We are always accepting new membership applications. Please sign up on our newsletter page to receive a membership form or email us at scgs.mgmt@gmail.com. Membership is free for students and $35 for professionals.

Current SCGS Officers:

Meetings

South Coast Geological Society and Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists invite you to join our joint meeting on Wednesday, August 22nd at 6PM to be held at Dave & Buster’s in Orange, CA. We are thrilled to co-host Dr. Jeff Marshall, Professor for the Geological Sciences Department at Cal Poly Pomona. Dr. Marshall will share his presentation titled “Sizing up the subduction beast: A tale of earthquakes and ancient shorelines in Costa Rica and New Zealand”

Title:

Sizing up the subduction beast: A tale of earthquakes and ancient shorelines in Costa Rica and New Zealand

Abstract:

The seismic hazards of subduction zones are substantial, as exemplified by Vulcania and 2010 Japan (Mw 9.0) megathrust earthquakes and tsunami, which killed more than a quarter-million people. Convergent plate margins account for more than 80% of global seismic moment release, and recent research has revealed a broad spectrum of slip behavior on megathrust faults, ranging from stick-slip earthquakes to tremor and slow-slip. This talk will explore ongoing geomorphic and paleoseismic investigations along the coastlines of Costa Rica and New Zealand that provide new insights into megathrust fault segmentation and rupture behavior over multiple seismic cycles.

The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica forms a prominent morphologic high along the Middle America forearc, where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate at 90 mm/yr. This emergent coastal landmass overlies the megathrust along a seismogenic zone that produces frequent major earthquakes, as well as periodic slow slip events. Quaternary marine and fluvial terraces record a net uplift pattern consistent with the peninsula’s overall topographic form. Terrace mapping, surveying, and geochronology (14C, OSL, TCN) reveal uplift variations that coincide with three domains of subducting seafloor (EPR, CNS-1, CNS-2), with uplift rates of 0.1-0.2 m/ky inboard of older EPR crust in the north, 0.2-0.5 m/ky inboard of younger CNS-1 crust along the central coast, and 1.5-2.5 m/ky inboard of CNS-2 seamounts impacting the peninsula’s southern tip. The two most recent large Nicoya earthquakes (1950 Mw7.8; 2012 Mw7.6) generated decimeter-scale coseismic uplift along the central coast. The 2012 uplift pattern coincides with the area of mainshock slip, pre-event locking, and prior 1950 coseismic uplift. Most of the 1950 uplift was recovered by interseismic subsidence during six decades of strain accumulation leading to the 2012 rupture. While elastic strain accumulation and release produce short-term cycles of uplift and subsidence, long-term net uplift results in gradual coastal emergence and the growth of topographic relief. Net uplift along the central Nicoya segment may be the product of irrecoverable seismic-cycle strain (shortening), coupled with tectonic erosion near the trench and subsequent underplating of eroded material at depth beneath the peninsula. Our results are consistent with geophysical observations that indicate along-strike segmentation of the Nicoya seismogenic zone and the presence of three principal earthquake source areas: 1) Papagayo (1916, M>7.0), 2) Nicoya (1950, Mw7.8; 2012 Mw7.6), and 3) Cobano (1990 Mw7.3). Historic ruptures within all three segments have produced damaging and deadly earthquakes in the past and should be expected to do so again in the future.

The Hikurangi subduction margin along North Island, New Zealand accommodates oblique convergence of the Pacific Plate beneath the Australian plate at 45 mm/yr. Along the southern margin, pronounced frontal accretion and forearc uplift occur inboard of the subducting Hikurangi plateau, in an area of strong interface locking and deep slow slip. In the north, subduction erosion and serrated coastal uplift occur inboard of subducting seamounts on the plateau flank, in an area of weaker locking and shallow slow slip. Emergent marine terraces and paleo-shorelines along the Hikurangi margin record tectonic uplift over two time scales: 1) short-term episodic uplift events during the Holocene (0-10 ky), and 2) long-term net deformation during the Pleistocene (10-500 ky). Along the Wairarapa segment in the south, a narrow coastal lowland preserves uplifted Holocene terraces and beach ridges that record up to seven prehistoric earthquakes. LiDAR imagery allows for correlation of paleo-shorelines and field sites where 14C ages constrain paleo-earthquake timing. Up to four higher elevation Pleistocene marine terraces in this area characterize long-term uplift and margin-parallel folding, with OSL ages constraining deformation rates. Along the southern Hawke’s Bay segment (central Hikurangi margin), up to three Holocene terraces record paleo-earthquakes near Cape Kidnappers. LiDAR mapping, field surveying, and 14C dating constrain the timing and magnitude of coseismic uplift events. Several higher Pleistocene terraces characterize long-term uplift and deformation along the Kidnappers anticline. Along the northern Hawke’s Bay segment, a continuous flight of Holocene and Pleistocene marine terraces at Mahia Peninsula record outer forearc uplift and tilting above the upper-plate Lachlan thrust. Five steps within the Holocene terrace are interpreted as discrete coseismic uplift events. Along the Raukumara segment in the north, localized Pleistocene terraces and Holocene platforms occur at varying elevations, recording differential coastal uplift and paleo-earthquake events. Along the Hikurangi margin as a whole, tectonic uplift is a product of complex interactions between deep megathrust slip and shallow upper-plate faulting. Uplifted Holocene paleo-shorelines record single coseismic uplift events, while Pleistocene terraces characterize net deformation patterns. Continued mapping, field surveying, and age dating along strike of the Hikurangi margin will help differentiate between very large margin-wide megathrust ruptures (M8.0-9.0+) and smaller, more localized, upper-plate thrust events (M7.0-8.0). Both earthquake types pose a significant seismic and tsunami hazard for New Zealand residents.

Speaker Information:

Dr. Jeff Marshall is a Professor of Geological Sciences at Cal Poly Pomona University and an adjunct professor with the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies. He is a geomorphologist with research and teaching expertise in neotectonics, geologic hazards, coastal processes, fluvial geomorphology, and watershed restoration. Much of his research has focused on the tectonics and earthquake hazards of active plate margins, with multiple publications in peer-reviewed journals, and over 30 years of experience conducting field research in California, Central America, Mexico, and New Zealand. His fieldwork has included studies of active tectonics and landscape evolution, forearc deformation and seismic-cycle uplift, fault structure and kinematics, coastal geomorphology and sedimentology, volcanic stratigraphy, landslide hazards, and Quaternary geochronology. He maintains long-standing research collaborations with many U.S. and international colleagues, including the Costa Rican Volcanologic and Seismologic Observatory (OVSICORI-UNA) and the New Zealand Geological Survey (GNS Science). For the past 20 years, Dr. Marshall has been involved in the research and education efforts of the National Science Foundation MARGINS and GeoPRISMS Programs including funded coastal tectonics research in Costa Rica and New Zealand, serving on the GeoPRISMS Education Advisory Committee, and leading field trips, workshops, and student research symposia in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, New Zealand, and the U.S. He has substantial experience mentoring international undergraduate field research with both the Keck Geology Consortium and his own NSF REU projects. Dr. Marshall is a five-term Geosciences Councilor with the national Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and former University Coordinator for Undergraduate Research at Cal Poly Pomona. He also serves on the California State University Council on Ocean Affairs, Science, and Technology (COAST) and is a member of the Water Resources and Policy Initiative (WRPI). In 2018, he received the Ralph W. Ames Distinguished Research Award from the Cal Poly Pomona College of Science. Dr. Marshall studied geology and earth surface processes at UC Santa Barbara (BA), UC Santa Cruz (MS), and Penn State (PhD).

Newsletter

Abstract:
The seismic hazards of subduction zones are substantial, as exemplified by the 2004 Sumatra (Mw 9.2) and 2010 Japan (Mw 9.0) megathrust earthquakes and tsunami, which killed more than a quarter-million people. Convergent plate margins account for more than 80% of global seismic moment release, and recent research has revealed a broad spectrum of slip behavior on megathrust faults, ranging from stick-slip earthquakes to tremor and slow-slip. This talk will explore ongoing geomorphic and paleoseismic investigations along the coastlines of Costa Rica and New Zealand that provide new insights into megathrust fault segmentation and rupture behavior over multiple seismic cycles.
The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica forms a prominent morphologic high along the Middle America forearc, where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate at 90 mm/yr. This emergent coastal landmass overlies the megathrust along a seismogenic zone that produces frequent major earthquakes, as well as periodic slow slip events. Quaternary marine and fluvial terraces record a net uplift pattern consistent with the peninsula’s overall topographic form. Terrace mapping, surveying, and geochronology (14C, OSL, TCN) reveal uplift variations that coincide with three domains of subducting seafloor (EPR, CNS-1, CNS-2), with uplift rates of 0.1-0.2 m/ky inboard of older EPR crust in the north, 0.2-0.5 m/ky inboard of younger CNS-1 crust along the central coast, and 1.5-2.5 m/ky inboard of CNS-2 seamounts impacting the peninsula’s southern tip. The two most recent large Nicoya earthquakes (1950 Mw7.8; 2012 Mw7.6) generated decimeter-scale coseismic uplift along the central coast. The 2012 uplift pattern coincides with the area of mainshock slip, pre-event locking, and prior 1950 coseismic uplift. Most of the 1950 uplift was recovered by interseismic subsidence during six decades of strain accumulation leading to the 2012 rupture. While elastic strain accumulation and release produce short-term cycles of uplift and subsidence, long-term net uplift results in gradual coastal emergence and the growth of topographic relief. Net uplift along the central Nicoya segment may be the product of irrecoverable seismic-cycle strain (shortening), coupled with tectonic erosion near the trench and subsequent underplating of eroded material at depth beneath the peninsula. Our results are consistent with geophysical observations that indicate along-strike segmentation of the Nicoya seismogenic zone and the presence of three principal earthquake source areas: 1) Papagayo (1916, M>7.0), 2) Nicoya (1950, Mw7.8; 2012 Mw7.6), and 3) Cobano (1990 Mw7.3). Historic ruptures within all three segments have produced damaging and deadly earthquakes in the past and should be expected to do so again in the future.
The Hikurangi subduction margin along North Island, New Zealand accommodates oblique convergence of the Pacific Plate beneath the Australian plate at 45 mm/yr. Along the southern margin, pronounced frontal accretion and forearc uplift occur inboard of the subducting Hikurangi plateau, in an area of strong interface locking and deep slow slip. In the north, subduction erosion and serrated coastal uplift occur inboard of subducting seamounts on the plateau flank, in an area of weaker locking and shallow slow slip. Emergent marine terraces and paleo-shorelines along the Hikurangi margin record tectonic uplift over two time scales: 1) short-term episodic uplift events during the Holocene (0-10 ky), and 2) long-term net deformation during the Pleistocene (10-500 ky). Along the Wairarapa segment in the south, a narrow coastal lowland preserves uplifted Holocene terraces and beach ridges that record up to seven prehistoric earthquakes. LiDAR imagery allows for correlation of paleo-shorelines and field sites where 14C ages constrain paleo-earthquake timing. Up to four higher elevation Pleistocene marine terraces in this area characterize long-term uplift and margin-parallel folding, with OSL ages constraining deformation rates. Along the southern Hawke’s Bay segment (central Hikurangi margin), up to three Holocene terraces record paleo-earthquakes near Cape Kidnappers. LiDAR mapping, field surveying, and 14C dating constrain the timing and magnitude of coseismic uplift events. Several higher Pleistocene terraces characterize long-term uplift and deformation along the Kidnappers anticline. Along the northern Hawke’s Bay segment, a continuous flight of Holocene and Pleistocene marine terraces at Mahia Peninsula record outer forearc uplift and tilting above the upper-plate Lachlan thrust. Five steps within the Holocene terrace are interpreted as discrete coseismic uplift events. Along the Raukumara segment in the north, localized Pleistocene terraces and Holocene platforms occur at varying elevations, recording differential coastal uplift and paleo-earthquake events. Along the Hikurangi margin as a whole, tectonic uplift is a product of complex interactions between deep megathrust slip and shallow upper-plate faulting. Uplifted Holocene paleo-shorelines record single coseismic uplift events, while Pleistocene terraces characterize net deformation patterns. Continued mapping, field surveying, and age dating along strike of the Hikurangi margin will help differentiate between very large margin-wide megathrust ruptures (M8.0-9.0+) and smaller, more localized, upper-plate thrust events (M7.0-8.0). Both earthquake types pose a significant seismic and tsunami hazard for New Zealand residents.

Dr. Jeff Marshall is a Professor of Geological Sciences at Cal Poly Pomona University

Speaker Information:
Dr. Jeff Marshall is a Professor of Geological Sciences at Cal Poly Pomona University and an adjunct professor with the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies. He is a geomorphologist with research and teaching expertise in neotectonics, geologic hazards, coastal processes, fluvial geomorphology, and watershed restoration. Much of his research has focused on the tectonics and earthquake hazards of active plate margins, with multiple publications in peer-reviewed journals, and over 30 years of experience conducting field research in California, Central America, Mexico, and New Zealand. His fieldwork has included studies of active tectonics and landscape evolution, forearc deformation and seismic-cycle uplift, fault structure and kinematics, coastal geomorphology and sedimentology, volcanic stratigraphy, landslide hazards, and Quaternary geochronology. He maintains long-standing research collaborations with many U.S. and international colleagues, including the Costa Rican Volcanologic and Seismologic Observatory (OVSICORI-UNA) and the New Zealand Geological Survey (GNS Science). For the past 20 years, Dr. Marshall has been involved in the research and education efforts of the National Science Foundation MARGINS and GeoPRISMS Programs including funded coastal tectonics research in Costa Rica and New Zealand, serving on the GeoPRISMS Education Advisory Committee, and leading field trips, workshops, and student research symposia in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, New Zealand, and the U.S. He has substantial experience mentoring international undergraduate field research with both the Keck Geology Consortium and his own NSF REU projects. Dr. Marshall is a five-term Geosciences Councilor with the national Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and former University Coordinator for Undergraduate Research at Cal Poly Pomona. He also serves on the California State University Council on Ocean Affairs, Science, and Technology (COAST) and is a member of the Water Resources and Policy Initiative (WRPI). In 2018, he received the Ralph W. Ames Distinguished Research Award from the Cal Poly Pomona College of Science. Dr. Marshall studied geology and earth surface processes at UC Santa Barbara (BA), UC Santa Cruz (MS), and Penn State (PhD).
Presidents Corner
Hello South Coasters,
What a summer it has been! Thanks to everyone who came out to see our local Phil Hughes share his unique Alaskan field excursion with us. Also, this weekend concluded our first round of Hike and Brews. Thank you all who made it out and I especially thank those that put them together including Allison Bieda, Jenifer Leidelmeijer, and Garrett Mottle.

This Wednesday is our joint AEG Meeting held at Dave & Busters in Orange with a talk from Dr. Jeff Marshall of Cal Poly Pomona about earthquakes and ancient shorelines in Costa Rica and New Zealand. We haven’t even gotten to the talk and I’ve already learned something really interesting from the abstract “Convergent plate margins account for more than 80% of global seismic moment release.” That’s so cool to think about.

On Tuesday (8/21) the Orange County Geo-Institue Chapter (part of ASCE) is hosting a talk in Costa Mesa by Dr. Marty Hudson, PE, GE, and Ms. Rosalind Munro, PG, CEG of Wood Group, on the design challenges of a mid-rise hotel cantilevered over an active fault in Hollywood. Information is in a link below.

Work to revise and approve the Bylaws is continuing the a schedule that will take us get us there by the end of the year. Below are links to the draft bylaws and also a summary presentation. The process is anticipated to be:

Discuss the changes at the August 22nd meeting
Take comments to the draft bylaws
Nominate Board of Directors
Send out official ballots in October
Vote on the Bylaws and Board of Directors at the November 5th meeting
Announce results of the voting at the December 3rd meeting
Start 2019 with a Board of Directors and New Officers
And I saved the best for last, I know you’re excited about the Southern Cascades Field Trip which is in six weeks. A registration link is included below and on our website. The trip will cost $145 for members, $190 for non-members, $95 for students (first 10, $145 thereafter). The fee includes the road log, a digital guidebook, t-shirt, porta-pottys, and meals and beverages from Friday dinner to Sunday lunch.
The camping location is Harris Spring Campground (41.457, -121.785) on USFS land outside of McCloud. Attendees are responsible for their own transportation but we’d like to facilitate options. The main options are:
Drive/carpool, 12 hours each way, $150 in gas per car (up and back)
SCGS will have a rental van for up to 10 people that will leave Friday and return Monday. Costs will be shared evenly by those who take it (~$60).

Fly, 6 hours each way (check-in, rental car, drive), $100-$200 for the flights (Southwest from Long Beach looks the best) and $200-$500 per rental car (sedan is fine; $60 in gas)

As part of registration we would like you to report your choice in a google document so that you can coordinate with others. I know this trip may be a tough one to get to but it will be worth it!

See you Wednesday!

Ben Lewis
SCGS President, 2018

2018 Draft of Updated SCGS Bylaws
Bylaws Draft Presentation
OC Geo-Institute: Design Challenges of a Mid-Rise Hotel on an Active Fault

Ben Lewis, SCGS President
2018 SCGS Field Trip
Southern Cascades of California:
featuring Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake Volcano, Lava Beds National Monument, and more!
South Coast Geological Society is heading to the Southern Cascades for our 45th Annual Field Trip on September 28th to October 1st, 2018! The field trip is being led by Dr. Brandon Browne, Humboldt State University and Ben Lewis, President, South Coast Geological Society.
The camping location is Harris Spring Campground (41.457, -121.785) on USFS land outside of McCloud. Attendees are responsible for their own transportation but we’d like to facilitate options.
The main options are:

  1. Drive/carpool, 12 hours each way, $150 in gas per car (up and back).
  2. SCGS will have a rental van for up to 12 people that will leave Friday at 6AM and return Monday around 8PM. Costs will be shared evenly by those who take it (~$60). SCGS Officer will be the designated driver.
  3. Fly, 6 hours travel time each way (check-in, rental car), $100-$200 for the flights (Southwest from Long Beach to Sacramento) and $200-$500 per rental car (sedan is fine; $60 in gas).

As part of registration we would like you to report your transportation choice in a google document so that you can coordinate with others.

Itinerary Details:
Friday: Arrive to Harris Springs Campground (Travel Day)
Saturday: Medicine Lake Volcano and Lava Beds National Monument (glass mountain, lava tubes, recent volcanic deposits)
Sunday: Mount Shasta tour-around (various volcanic deposits, landslide deposits)
Monday: Depart to home (Travel Day)

Costs:
The Fees for the 2018 South Coast Geological Society Field Trip are as follows:
Regular Member: $145
Student Member: $95 (First 10 students); $145 thereafter pending sponsorship availability.
Non-Member: $190

The cost includes camp site fees, food from dinner on Friday night to lunch on Sunday and everything in between (6 meals total), field trip t-shirt, beverages (beer, wine, water, soda), port-a-potty’s, a printed Road Log book, and digital 2017 Field Trip Guidebook.

Fieldtrip Registration Form
Visit the SCGS Fieldtrip Webpage
2018 SCGS Field Trip Student Sponsorship
We are grateful for the members who are so supportive and encouraging through their generosity.Your generous contributions have provided several students with the opportunity to attend our annual field trips to network, learn, and become involved with the society
A donation of $100 supports 2 student attendees.
Please email SCGS if you are interested in sponsoring students to attend the field trip. In addition, Sponsors will be recognized according to our sponsorship tiers. South Coast Geological Society is a 501©(3) nonprofit organization which makes all donations tax deductible.
Contact SCGS to become a Student Sponsor
MEMBERSHIP
Your membership in 2017 allowed SCGS to host stellar field trips, provide over $2,000 in student scholarships, and improve the society in many ways. South Coast Geological Society raises our annual budget through private contributions, so your membership is essential for us to continue the society, make improvements, provide phenomenal meetings, host field trips, and award student scholarships. To support the goals of SCGS we are asking for your membership renewal for 2018.

A membership to South Coast Geological Society has many benefits including discounted meeting and field trip costs, exclusive field trips and events, and more!
We welcome you to join SCGS, one of the largest, most active Geological Societies in Southern California.
Membership Costs:
Professionals: $35 / year
Students: Free

Click Here for the Membership Form!
South Coast Geological Society Corporate Sponsorship

SCGS greatly appreciates our Corporate Sponsors! Corporate sponsorship allows SCGS to host stellar field trips, provide annual scholarships, and publish guidebooks. There are four Corporate Sponsorship Levels: DIAMOND ($1,000+), GOLD ($500+), SILVER ($250+), and BRONZE ($100+).
THANK YOU 2018 SPONSORS!

Click Here to Become a Corporate Sponsor!
MEETING HIGHLIGHTS

We want to thank all the members who travelled near and far distancing to join us for a fantastic evening with Mr. Phil Hughes.

Mr. Hughes, provided us with an exceptional presentation titled: Too Hot to Handle, Too Cold to Hold: An Undergraduate Field Research Program by Santa Ana College and the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

UPCOMING EVENTS

September/October: 45th Annual Field Trip

November: 24th Annual Poster Session

December: Annual Holiday Party and Raffle

South Coast Geological Society Hike+Brew: Whiting Ranch Red Rock Canyon

South Coast Geological Society Hike+Brew: Portuguese Bend Reserve
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists – So. California
Association for Women Geoscientists – LA/OC Chapter
American Society of Civil Engineers
Coast Geological Society
Groundwater Resources Association of California – So. California
Inland Geological Society
Los Angeles Basin Geological Society
San Diego Association of Geologists
San Joaquin Geological Society
Southern California Paleontological Society
GEOLOGY FUN

Why should you never fight a dinosaur?
Because you’ll get jurasskicked.
SUPPORT US

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Visit AmazonSmile

Harold’s Car Donation will handle everything from start to finish, from FREE Towing of your vehicle to ensuring ALL DMV paperwork is properly filed and handled, getting you the most out of your donation.
Your tax deduction is the price at which the car or vehicle sells. You get rid of an unwanted car and the satisfaction of helping others, and you pay less income tax.

We accept all Cars, Trucks, Vans, Boats, Motor-homes, Junk Cars, Disabled cars, and Wrecked cars. No Title? Failed Smog Check? No Problem!

Visit Harold’s Car Donation

Membership

Welcome South Coast Members and Supporters! Are you interested in a 2017 SCGS membership? If so, please complete and submit the form below. A membership to South Coast Geological Society has many benfits including discounted meeting and field trip costs. We welcome you to join SCGS, one of the largest, most active Geological Societies in Southern California.

Payment: South Coast accepts membership payment via mail, PayPal, and in person at our meetings/events. Membership costs: $35 for professionals and free of charge for students. (PayPal link at bottom)
Mail can be sent to:
South Coast Geological Society
P.O. Box 10244
Santa Ana, CA 92711

Corporate Sponsors

SCGS greatly appreciates our Corporate Sponsors!

Thanks to your contributions in 2017, we were able to provide over $2,000 in student scholarships, host our Annual Field Trip to the Coachella Valley featuring guided tours of Mecca Hills, San Andreas Fault Zone, Painted Canyon, Box Canyon, Dos Palmas Reserve, Ormat Geothermal Plant, host an Angels Stadium Tailgate and baseball game, and another Field Techniques and Methods Course focused on soils classification laboratory and field techniques. With your help we will continue to provide another great year for the South Coast Geological Society and its affiliates. Your TAX-DEDUCTIBLE corporate sponsorship allows SCGS to host stellar field trips, provide annual scholarships, and publish guidebooks. We have expanded our format to accept multiple levels of contributions, labeled as Diamond, Gold, Silver and Bronze levels. The contributions are as follows:
DIAMOND LEVEL ($1,000+) – Includes your logo on our Annual Field Trip shirt, a personal gift thanking your company for their generous contribution, your company logo, name, and link on our website & newsletter, a one-half page sized ad in our annual road log publication and guidebook, advertising in our monthly newsletter, and membership for ten (10) company affiliates.

GOLD LEVEL ($500) – Includes a personal gift thanking your company for their generous contribution, your company logo, name, and link on our website & newsletter, a quarter-page sized ad in our annual road log publication and guidebook, advertising in our monthly newsletter, and membership for five (5) company affiliates.

SILVER LEVEL ($250) – Includes your company logo, name, and link on our website & newsletter, advertising in our monthly newsletter, a eighth-page sized ad in our annual road log publication and guidebook, and membership for three (3) company affiliates.

BRONZE LEVEL ($100) – Includes your name and link on website & newsletter, advertising in our monthly newsletter, a sixteenth-page sized ad in our annual road log publication and guidebook, and membership for one (1) individual.

To contribute, please fill out the questions below. We are happy to receive payment through PayPal, mailed check, or personally at any of our meetings.

If you require execution of any other documentation in support of your tax deductible donation, please let us know at the time of your remittance. Should you have any questions, please contact us by email at SCGS.mgmt@gmail.com.

Checks can be mailed to:

SCGS Corporate Sponsorship

P.O. Box 10244

Santa Ana, CA 92711

Corporate Sponsorship

Your corporate sponsorship allows SCGS to host stellar field trips, provide annual scholarships, and publish guidebooks.
We have expanded our format to accept multiple levels of contributions, categorized as Diamond, Gold, Silver and Bronze levels.

The contributions are as follows:

DIAMOND ($1,000 +)
Includes your logo on our Annual Field Trip shirt, a personal gift thanking your company for their generous contribution, your company logo, name, and link on our website & newsletter, a one-half page sized ad in our annual road log publication, advertising in our monthly newsletter, and membership for ten (10) company affiliates.

GOLD ($500)
Includes a personal gift thanking your company for their generous contribution, your company logo, name, and link on our website & newsletter, a business-card sized ad in our annual road log publication, advertising in our monthly newsletter, and membership for five (5) company affiliates.

SILVER ($250)
Includes your company logo, name, and link on our website & newsletter, advertising in our monthly newsletter, and membership for three (3) company affiliates.

BRONZE ($100)
Includes your name and link on website & newsletter, and membership for one (1) individual.

To contribute, please fill out the questions below. We are happy to receive payment through PayPal, a mailed check or personally at any of our meetings.

Publications

Interested in learning about California Geology and other regions? South Coast Geological Society has published numerous guidebooks highlighting the Geology of California and other nearby regions such as Nevada, Mexico. A guidebook is published following each of the Society’s annual field trips. The guidebooks contain the field trip road guide, and a compilation of original and previously published articles pertaining to the field area visited during the field trip.

Publications are the main source of revenue for the Society. Revenues are used for scholarships, to donate to foundations, and to improve the annual fieldtrips.












Field Trips

2018 – 45th Annual Field Trip:
Southern Cascades of California: featuring Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake Volcano, Lava Beds National Monument, and more!

About:

South Coast Geological Society is heading to the Southern Cascades for our 45th Annual Field Trip on September 28th to October 1st, 2018! The field trip is being led by Dr. Brandon Browne, Humboldt State University and Ben Lewis, President, South Coast Geological Society. The camping location is Harris Spring Campground (41.457, -121.785) on USFS land outside of McCloud. Attendees are responsible for their own transportation but we’d like to facilitate options. The main options are:

  1. Drive/carpool, 12 hours each way, $150 in gas per car (up and back).
  2. SCGS will have a rental van for up to 12 people that will leave Friday at 6AM and return Monday around 8PM. Costs will be shared evenly by those who take it (~$60). SCGS Officer will be the designated driver.
  3. Fly, 6 hours travel time each way (check-in, rental car), $100-$200 for the flights (Southwest from Long Beach to Sacramento) and $200-$500 per rental car (sedan is fine; $60 in gas).

As part of registration we would like you to report your transportation choice in a google document so that you can coordinate with others.

Details:
Friday: Arrive to Harris Springs Campground (Travel Day)
Saturday: Medicine Lake Volcano and Lava Beds National Monument (glass mountain, lava tubes, recent volcanic deposits)
Sunday: Mount Shasta tour-around (various volcanic deposits, landslide deposits)
Monday: Depart to home (Travel Day)

Costs:

The Fees for the 2018 South Coast Geological Society Field Trip are as follows:
Regular Member: $145
Student Member: $95 (First 10 students); $145 thereafter pending sponsorship availability.
Non-Member: $190

The cost includes camp site fees, food from dinner on Friday night to lunch on Sunday and everything in between (6 meals total), field trip t-shirt, beverages (beer, wine, water, soda), port-a-potty’s, a printed Road Log book, and digital 2017 Field Trip Guidebook.

Student Sponsorship:
Student field trip costs are offset by the generosity of our members. We value our sponsors! This year student sponsorship is $100 to support 2 student field trip attendees.

Please complete and submit the registration form below (Google Form).

See you there!

#SouthCoastGoingAllTheWay #SouthCoastGoesFar

“A trip of a lifetime! South Coasts’ furthest trip!” – Ben Lewis, President, 2018

“Worth the Drive! Unforgettable!” – Allison Bieda, Vice President, 2018

“A trip you DO NOT want to miss!” – Chris Baker, Past President, 2016

“Road trip! I’ll bring all my CD’s” – Georgie Aronson, Treasurer, 2018

“Shot-Gun times 2!” – Taylor Bogdanovich, Publications Manager, 2018


Tom Devine, Ben Lewis, and Dr. Brandon Browne viewing a map of Medicine Lake Volcanic deposits during the scouting trip.


Mount Shasta lookout.


Lava tube at Lava Bed National Monument.

Hike + Brew

Hiking Coordinator – Garrett Mottle

Sunday, June 10th – Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
Hike: Portuguese Bend Nature Reserve
(distance & elevation TBA)
Brew: San Pedro Brewing Company
331 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

RSVP for June Hike+Brew HERE
Sunday, August 19th – Pasadena, CA
Hike: Eaton Canyon Falls Trail via Eaton Canyon Nature Center ( 3.5 miles round-trip, 375 feet elevation gain)
Trailhead: 1750 North Altadena Drive, Pasadena, CA 91107
Trailhead coordinates: 34.17832, -118.09663 (34° 10′ 42″N 118° 05′ 47.9″W)
Brew: TBD

Job Opportunities

LANGAN, Irvine, CA

Engineering Geologist – 6 to 10 Years Experience

Job Description:
Langan seeks an Engineering Geologist in our Irvine, CA office. As the successful candidate, you will have 6-10 years of related work experience. Possession of a professional demeanor, practical field experience, and desire to learn is essential to this position.

Job Responsibilities:

Develop scope and execute field investigations;
Identify and implement field and lab work solutions;
Identify and characterize geologic hazards in the field;
Research and compile geologic data for projects;
Work with engineers to provide geologic support with respect to impact of site geologic conditions to site structures;
Develop geologic cross sections, geologic maps, and other pertinent figures for project reports;
Assist in training staff and quality control of staff work;
Prepare and review logs and reports;
Interact with clients and contractors; and
Manage projects and budgets.
Job Requirements:
Bachelors degree in Geology; MS preferred;
California Professional Geologist (PG) license registration;
6 to 10 years of experience in the field of engineering geology;
Experience with geologic hazard investigations, with emphasis on landslide, A-P fault rupture evaluations, and rockfall projects;
Experience with performing detailed geologic mapping at a professional level;
Experience with reviewing and interpreting stereo-paired aerial photographs;
Ability to effectively communicate technical details to clients, co-workers and staff; and,
Excellent technical writing skills.
Location: Irvine, California
To be considered for this position, please click on the link below to apply.
Link: www.langan.com/careers
In the Search for a Job section, go to the Type drop-down, select Professional, in the Location drop-down select Irvine and Submit.
Scroll down the page to view all opportunities and apply to Engineering Geologist – 6 to 10 Years Experience (29681).

LANGAN, San Francisco, San Jose or Oakland, CA

Engineering Geologist – 6 to 10 Years Experience

Job Description:
Langan seeks an Engineering Geologist in either our San Francisco, San Jose or Oakland office. As the successful candidate, you will have 6-10 years of related work experience. Possession of a professional demeanor, practical field experience, and desire to learn is essential to this position.

Job Responsibilities:

Develop scope and execute field investigations;
Identify and implement field and lab work solutions;
Identify and characterize geologic hazards in the field;
Research and compile geologic data for projects;
Work with engineers to provide geologic support with respect to impact of site geologic conditions to site structures;
Develop geologic cross sections, geologic maps, and other pertinent figures for project reports;
Assist in training staff and quality control of staff work;
Prepare and review logs and reports;
Interact with clients and contractors; and
Manage projects and budgets.
Job Requirements:
Bachelors degree in Geology; MS preferred
California Professional Geologist (PG) license registration;
6 to 10 years of experience in the field of engineering geology;
Experience with geologic hazard investigations, with emphasis on landslide, A-P fault rupture evaluations and rockfall projects;
Experience with performing detailed geologic mapping at a professional level;
Experience with reviewing and interpreting stereo-paired aerial photographs;
Ability to effectively communicate technical details to clients, co-workers, and staff; and,
Excellent technical writing skills.
Location: San Francisco, San Jose or Oakland, CA, California
To be considered for this position, please click on the link below to apply.
Link: www.langan.com/careers
In the Search for a Job section, go to the Type drop-down, select Professional, in the Category drop-down select Geotechnical and Submit.
Scroll down the page to view all opportunities and apply to Engineering Geologist – 6 to 10 Years Experience (28941).

Additional Resources

Featured Lectures:

Contact Us

General correspondence including questions, comments or concerns,

use our email Scgs.mgmt@gmail.com

For detailed correspondence please contact any officer.

President: Ben Lewis
Vice President: Allison Bieda
Secretary: Jenifer Leidelmeijer
Treasurer: Georgie Aronson
Publications Manager: Taylor Bogdanovich
Social Media Manager: Vanya Keyes

Mail can be sent to:
P.O. Box 10244
Santa Ana, CA 92711
Subscribe to our mailing list

Support Us

Ways to support South Coast Geological Society

AmazonSmile is a website operated by Amazon with the same products, prices, and shopping features as Amazon.com. The difference is that when you shop on AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price of eligible products to the charitable organization of your choice.

Harold’s Car Donation will handle everything from start to finish, from FREE Towing of your vehicle to ensuring ALL DMV paperwork is properly filed and handled, getting you the most out of your donation. Your tax deduction is the price at which the vehicle sells. You get rid of an unwanted car and the satisfaction of helping others, and you pay less income tax!
We accept all Cars, Trucks, Vans, Boats, Motor-homes, Junk Cars, Disabled cars, and Wrecked cars. No Title? Failed Smog Check? No Problem!


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